RECENT REVIEWS & ENDORSEMENTS

  • Scholarship Game, The
    Luke Arnce
    Definitely recommend for high school students that want to grasp the specifics of scholarships. It's always best to start early - this would help for that start. ~ TaeVon Lewis, TizzyMatic

  • How To Write a Chiller Thriller
    Sally Spedding
    This is a good reference book for writers who are considering writing a thriller. But I think it also helps with story structure in a book that has conflict and suspense. I will definitely use this as a go to when I'm feeling stuck in my writing. ~ Rosemary Rey, Goodreads

  • How To Write a Chiller Thriller
    Sally Spedding
    Insightful, informative and engaging. A really good book. I loved it and would recommend it to everyone. The book is a must read for every one learning to write. ~ Rubina Bashir, Booklove

  • Scholarship Game, The
    Luke Arnce

    Applying to colleges has changed since I first went back to college back in the 1990's. There are so many things you need to have and do to make a college want you as a student. This is a good book to read to help you survive the craziness that comes with applying and writing essays. There were multiple things in here I wish I had known when I went back to college a few years ago. Things that would have helped me immensely, especially in terms of various forms of financial aid. This is a great book to read along with all of the college catalogs you have to plow through. ~ Diana Thomas, NetGalley

  • How To Write a Chiller Thriller
    Sally Spedding
    In How To Write a Chiller Thriller Sally Spedding manages to coach, motivate and entertain at the same time. I found the combination to be wonderful and I am ready to (try) find the time to write the next great chiller thriller, or at least one that isn't horrible.

    This book offers ideas and suggestions based openly and honestly on Spedding's own experience yet stopped well short of being a "do as I say" guide to writing. In fact, she emphasizes from the beginning to be who you are and write what you want (all such statements come with qualifiers, of course, but the point stands) as long as it is from your passion.

    I found many of the exercises and examples very useful and am planning to take some time this spring and work my way more methodically through the book. Who knows, maybe next year at this time I will be asking for reviews! Or not, but I'll certainly enjoy trying to get to that point.

    I would highly recommend this to aspiring writers within the chiller thriller genre (kinda a hybrid of horror and thriller, she defines both terms at the beginning) and I also believe the tips and ideas are valid across genres for the most part so my recommendation carries over to any writer of fiction. ~ Earl Messer, NetGalley

  • Scholarship Game, The
    Luke Arnce
    The Scholarship Game is a guide to the college application and scholarship selection processes written from the perspective of someone who just finished them. The book provides a step-by-step walkthrough of the application process beginning with developing a resume and deciding where to apply, and ending with negotiating with colleges and making a final decision. It covers how to approach every aspect of a college application as well as tips for writing scholarship applications and breakdowns of every type of interview the author experienced during his own process.

    Author Luke Arnce, who was able to earn over $1,000,000 in scholarships and is currently attending Emory on a full-ride merit scholarship, shares his wisdom and insights to financing one's college education in The Scholarship Game: A No-Fluff Guide to Making College Affordable. Chapters walk the reader through building a resume, writing essays, obtaining letters of recommendation, presenting for interviews, and more, all to obtain scholarships to fund one's expensive education. The Scholarship Game is a "must-read" for every prospective college student, highly recommended. "Task-based group interviews are not evaluated on who builds the best whatever. They're judged on how well the candidates handle themselves in the situation and interact with their teammates. You may have the best idea ever, but if your team doesn't want to do it, you'll be better of listening to your teammates instead of going rogue." ~ Midwest Book Review

  • Scholarship Game, The
    Luke Arnce
    I loved this book and how it provides information about applying to colleges in a language that my 17 yr old understood. I am thankful for the information. ~ April Siggal, NetGalley/Goodreads

  • Scholarship Game, The
    Luke Arnce
    Luke Arnce is attending Emory University on a full-ride scholarship, so he obviously knows something about getting into and earning a scholarship for one of the top universities in the U.S. He has written a book to share the wealth of his knowledge with aspiring scholars: The Scholarship Game: A No-Fluff Guide to Making College Affordable. Useful.... a good place to start. ~ Paul Mastin, Reading Glutton

  • Scholarship Game, The
    Luke Arnce
    4/5 Stars

    I read this book in preparation for when my teen starts looking at colleges next year. I found it to be really helpful and informative. A lot has changed since I applied to college a couple of decades ago! I would recommend this book both to high schoolers looking at colleges and their parents in trying to figure out how to pay for it. ~ Pamela Johnson, NetGalley

  • How To Write a Chiller Thriller
    Sally Spedding
    Fun, cool exercises... entertaining and useful.

    ~ Les de Lioncourt, NetGalley/Goodreads

  • How To Write a Chiller Thriller
    Sally Spedding
    This book is full of terrific ideas and has fueled my imagination! I now need to settle down and choose which idea I want to develop into my story!
    ~ Janette Forman , NetGalley

  • How To Write a Chiller Thriller
    Sally Spedding
    Good practical handbook for aspiring authors of thrillers, in the broadest sense of the definition, but with a bias for horror (both supernatural and not).
    Lots of good advice and solid examples.
    Recommended. ~ Davide Mana, NetGalley

  • How To Write a Chiller Thriller
    Sally Spedding
    5 out of 5 stars;

    How to Write a Chiller Thriller sounds like something like a Stephen King or Hitchcock or Poe how-to guide for writers. However, it is much more contemporary and more example based than a standard concocted formula for authors of this genre. I have not read fictional work of Sally Spedding but reading through this book which I would much rather call an enjoyable guidebook, her candid fails and successes do more than hook. After a couple of pages, I actually had to stop and get a pen and diary to note down points! She starts with her twelve commandments, starting from the first; Actions first, explanations later to how the protagonist is portrayed to the plot and relationship between the writing and the writer. Spedding's guide is kinesthetic. She includes not just paragraphs or pages but chapters of her own work and some of others. She includes many references of authors and their works... so many that I have listed them to be over 65 ( it's taken up 4 sides of my journal). She mentions Mark Z Danielewski's House of Leaves repeatedly and reverently as her go-to book for inspiration in the genre (This is definitely making it to my reading list of this year). Moreover, she includes tasks with each chapter for the reader to attempt and questions, lists of ideas and activities. I don't want to summarise the book here but to give a preview, the book sequentially deals with the treatment of characters, psychology, layering, plot structures and many more. The chapters on point of view and examples of how shifting point of view from first to third person, from limited to omniscient changes the "feel" of the book. She encourages the reader/ author to experiment and scout around to find their voice. She gives practical advice like limiting chapters to 20 pages and why she thinks that should be so, how to build tension, keeping a balance between under-doing and overdoing suspense, avoiding putting in coincidences and cliches, and how to properly address prologues and epilogues. Endings, titles and synopses are key to the success of any book and Spedding doesn't shy away from what she thinks. There are things she says that work and things that an author should shy away from at all costs. There are also specific instructions on how one should edit their work (this reminded me of the rubrics and instructions that I used to give my students- a first aid kit for writing). Sometimes I like to copy word for word lines from a book for inspiration or to come back to. Below are some that I extracted from this book. 'But it's all been done,' you might complain. Not true. The key is passion. Your passion. Like people. even the most beautiful landscape or building can hide a dark side; be deadly dangerous. Rejoice in the best, but remember the worst so you won't make the same mistakes. ... setting can often be a novel's' main character_ for better or worse_ even shaping its human characters' psyches. If the setting is right, your characters will be in the right place. What I really like about this book is that it is not vague. I have read books on writing that beat about the bush before finally getting to some point or the other, or depend on the reader's inference rather than stating clearly the things that are truly helpful. Spedding is concise. She is blunt. She is clear. And she is encouraging. For more book reviews visit: https://zahraammar.wordpress.com ~ Zahra Ammar, https://zahraammar.wordpress.com/2016/07/27/how-to-write-a-chiller-thriller/

  • How To Write a Chiller Thriller
    Sally Spedding
    How to Write a Chiller Thriller by Sally Spedding was received , who doesn't want to write the ultimate novel? Some have given it a shot and some still only dream. To write the novel this book gives a person some pointers ( didn't figure that out from the title)? Each chapter has writing exercises to help aspiring or established writers along as well many have as examples of the chapters theme; the author tends to act as if publishers like "new blood" and experimentation, as a writer I disagree, it seems publishers choose the same writers over and over with rarely any experimentation, thus self publishing, be it good or bad, has exploded and traditional publishing houses are grasping for continued relevance, that being said it had nothing really to do with this book review. If you or someone you know aspires to be a fiction writer, you cannot go wrong buying this book and learning some of the craft.

    4 Stars ~ Jeffrey Wells, NetGalley - Goodreads - http://authorjaywhales.wix.com/mid-western-stories#!How-to-Write-a-Chiller-Thriller-by-Sally-Spedding/c1q8z/577d805e0cf21e6e1ebbffdb

  • Compass Points - Edit is a Four-Letter Word
    Glynis Scrivens
    Packed with useful, down-to-earth workable advice from successful authors on honing and polishing your prose, this is an invaluable tool for all writers. It's also very readable, featuring chatty interviews. I have to confess that I'm featured in it, but don't let that put you off! ~ Iain Pattison, Goodreads

  • Compass Points - Edit is a Four-Letter Word
    Glynis Scrivens
    As an editor, the title of this slim volume Edit is a Four-Letter Word by Glynis Scrivens caught my eye on the new book display in my local library. It is a guide for fiction writers on how to edit their own work, but still relevant to all writers.

    Here are some messages I liked from the author and other writers in the book:

    Edit is a four-letter word which requires other four-letter words: hard work, task, slog, pain and time.
    Editing is all about creating a good first impression.
    Aim for maximum impact with minimum words.
    A badly edited piece of work will appear to be poorly written.
    Language is your tool – use it wisely.
    90% of writing is rewriting.
    Editing will transform your first draft.
    For fiction writers, “edit” is the only path to other four-letter words: book deal, sale, cash and fame.

    Writers can and should edit their own work and a professional editor can add even more value. ~ Dr Rhonda Daniels, rightwithrhonda.com.au/2016/01/

  • Compass Points - Edit is a Four-Letter Word
    Glynis Scrivens
    EDIT IS A FOUR-LETTER WORD Book review by Steve Bowkett

    This is a very thorough and highly practical manual for all writers wishing to submit their work to potential literary agents, editors or competitions. Glynis Scrivens’ style is light, readable and authoritative without ever becoming didactic or overly prescriptive. Indeed, one of the central messages of the book is that while editing is an essential part of the
    writing
process,
there is no
magic
formula or
golden rule
for doing it.
Every writer
will evolve
his or her
own working
methods over
time. This
point is well
illustrated by contributions from a range of authors, including Simon Whaley and Lynne Hackles who have long-standing associations with NAWG.
    The book is well set out into accessible sections – The Nature of Editing, The Stages of Editing and Editing in Practice. These are further broken down into smaller chapters that cover, as one would expect, aspects of punctuation and grammar but also more unusual topics such as ‘when NOT to edit’, ‘when does rewriting stop and editing begin?’ and ‘reasons not to use spellcheck’. Contributing authors also deal with editing for different forms of writing such as the novel, short story and magazine article.
    The book concludes with some useful tips from a number of
    editors themselves who explain their own editing techniques, plus advice on how to judge when the editing process is finished.
    I highly recommend this book for all of us who strive for the highest standards when seeking to ‘make our work public’.

    ~ Steve Bowkett, Link magazine NAWG

  • Compass Points - Edit is a Four-Letter Word
    Glynis Scrivens
    This is an invaluable book for any writer out there who struggles with editing. The advice is clear and concise and was just what I needed at the time as I was struggling with writing a new book. This book helped me define when was best for me to edit. ( I had been editing as I went along and felt that I was becoming frustrated as my work wasn't flowing well.) I found it very encouraging reading how established authors approached editing. In fact this book is full of great insights from people who are successful at their art. It shows different ways of doing things. The author is engaging and straightforward. I enjoyed it immensely. ~ Colette Brown, amazon

  • Compass Points - Edit is a Four-Letter Word
    Glynis Scrivens
    What a wonderful way to help writers! It’s packed with helpful information, but in an entertaining way that makes it all so much more acceptable and interesting. I’m sure many people will be grateful for all you have written here, so succinctly and pleasingly. ~ Peter Lovesey

  • Compass Points - Edit is a Four-Letter Word
    Glynis Scrivens
    Practical, clear, easy to read and understand, Glynis’s book is perfect for those who quake at the thought of editing their work. In her no nonsense, no waffle account anyone who gets in muddle polishing their work will gain confidence as they journey through the pages of this book.

    It starts with the all important advice of when NOT to edit and leads us through the editing process to the point of knowing when to stop!

    Glynis has interviewed writers, editors, competition judges and literary agents for an overview of what good editing entails and it is interesting to see how other writers approach the editing process. I thoroughly enjoyed reading the various methods from different writers, which illustrated clearly that what works for one might not work for another. There is a confidence that comes from learning that there is no one right or wrong way just the way that works for you and this book offers it in abundance.

    There is a clear explanation of grammar, different types of editing, common mistakes and exercises to strengthen your editing skills. Her subtitle -How to Create the Best First Impression says it all. When sending out your work it needs to be polished and professional and with this book to hand you’ll be able to achieve that with ease. ~ Tracy Baines

AUTHORS YOU MIGHT LIKE
  • Linda M. JamesLinda M. JamesLinda James' psychological thriller THE DAY OF THE SWANS was a finalist in The People’s Book Prize...
  • Nik MortonNik MortonNik is a published author of 15 books of fiction, in several genres. He has sold hundreds of article...
  • Simon WhaleySimon WhaleySimon Whaley is the bestselling author of 100 Ways For A Dog To Train Its Human, which spent four we...
  • Solange HandoSolange HandoSolange Hando is an award-winning travel writer and photographer, editor, contributing author, speak...
  • Katya WilliamsonKatya Williamson
  • Susan PalmquistSusan PalmquistSusan Palmquist is a freelance writer and author of novels, novellas and short stories. Her work has...
  • Alison ChisholmAlison ChisholmAlison Chisholm has been writing poetry for over 40 years, and has had ten collections published, (n...
  • Deborah DurbinDeborah DurbinDeborah Durbin is the author of 11 non-fiction books and one novel. She has 15 years' experience wor...
  • Judy HallJudy HallAn internationally known author, astrologer, psychic, healer and workshop leader, Judy has been a ka...
  • Tim WardTim WardTim Ward is an author, publisher, teacher, and traveler. He has written five books about his travels...
  • John HuntJohn HuntJohn Hunt has spent his life in publishing. Semi-retired, he now works as a reader and advisor in hi...
  • Sally SpeddingSally SpeddingSally was born by the sea near Porthcawl to a Dutch father and Welsh mother. She trained in sculptur...
  • Jay RamsayJay RamsayJay Ramsay is an acclaimed poet, teacher, workshop leader, performer and UKCP accredited psychosynth...
  • Colin  BulmanColin BulmanColin Bulman works part-time for the Writers Bureau and Writer's Home Study Correspondence schools (...
  • Jenny RocheJenny RocheJenny Roche has over 15 years' experience of tutoring courses in comedy writing, scriptwriting and j...
POPULAR TOPICS